reading

Influence

Great presentation by Graham Brown,founder of Mobile Youth. He's a super smart guy connected with other super smart people all over the world(including me, if you leave out the super smart part), teaching brands how to connect with young consumers.

I just got my copy of his new book, All Is Social (thanks Graham!). The subtitle — Social Thinking and the End of the Big Idea expresses an idea I've been saying for years: Ideas are nothing, action is everything.

The road to hell has so far has been paved with big ideas, which is advertising-speak for an idea developed by a creative director with a big ego and bought by a client who isn't really paying attention. In most cases, these ideas are not driven by any real knowledge of how consumers really live.

Discretionary income is in the hands of an educated generation with exacting standards. Brown's book talks about the shift away from big agency ideas that throw money at an invisible consumer. At the very least you come away with a discussion on the new keys to brand success, but more importantly it's a story about the new global community and the social codes that connect us all. Read the book and let us know what you think.

 

Rework

Rework by Fried & Hansson, photo by Emily Norton What are you reading? You should be reading Rework by Jason Fried from 37Signals. His company makes a ton of money by selling software and has very little infrastructure and the typical corporate bullshit that weighs down too many companies. No offense, of course, to all of the companies weighed down by the typical corporate bullshit. If you're not ready to get the book, you can see an excerpt here at Change This. My favorite bit:

Start making something We all have that one friend who says, “I had the idea for eBay. If only I had acted on it, I’d be a billionaire!” That logic is pathetic and delusional. Having the idea for eBay has nothing to do with actually creating eBay. What you do is what matters, not what you think or say or plan. Think your ideas that valuable? Then go try to sell it and see what you get for it. Not much is probably the answer. Until you actually start making something, your brilliant idea is just that— an idea. And everyone’s got one of those. Stanley Kubrick gave this advice to aspiring filmmakers: “Get hold of a camera and some film and make a movie of any kind at all.” Kubrick knew that when you’re new at something, you need to start creating. The most important thing is to begin. So get a camera, hit record, and start shooting. Ideas are cheap and plentiful. The original pitch idea is such a small part of a business that it’s almost negligible. The real question is how well you execute. Embrace constraints “I don’t have enough time/money/people/experience.” Stop whining. Less is a good thing. Constraints are advantages in disguise. Limited resources force you to make do with what you’ve got. There’s no room for waste. And that forces you to be creative. Ever seen the weapons that prisoners make out of soap and other everyday items? They make do with what they’ve got. Now we’re not saying you should go out and shank somebody—but get creative and you’ll be amazed at what you can make with just a little.

But seriously, what are you reading? Tell us in the comments.