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Do You Vine?

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Vine is THE IT app right now. Twitter released it only a month and a half ago, and over 100,000 VINE videos were created in just the first weekend. Paris fashion week is going on right now and VINE is popping up everywhere. The app lets users create, post, and loop a six second video with sound.

VINE has done really well with the early adopter tech crowd and the blogosphere, and for agencies and businesses Vine has the potential for improving brand awareness, marketing, advertising, and boosting conversations with consumers. This, of course, is only if it is implemented correctly. Otherwise it could fade out as quickly as it came in. A lot of brands have taken to VINE to show off their personalities, but American Airlines is the first to integrate VINE into a marketing campaign. Interested in a free flight to London? All you have to do is VINE.

 

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Work from home

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This article about Yahoo! CEO Marissa Mayer banning the company’s work-from-home policy is shocking. I’m shocked that Yahoo! is still one of the country’s 500 largest companies. The decision by Mayer has caused a lot of debate on both sides of the issue. It has also garnered more publicity than Yahoo! has seen in a decade.

Personally, I’m a fan of the Results-Oriented Word Environment. Give people more freedom and treat them like adults. I understand this doesn’t work for every company, but I think it has a lot more potential beyond the companies who have embraced it.

I get the point, which is essentially that desperate times call for desperate measures. But I also think that under stress, leaders resort to the practices they’re most comfortable with. That’s really when they need to dig deeper into the things they profess. What’s happening is that Yahoo! employees are learning what leadership truly values, which may be different than what they’ve been saying up to now.

Below is the memo in full. Your thoughts on the work from home ban?

 

 

 

 

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Walking the Path

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William Ury: The walk from “no” to “yes”

William Ury is a very smart guy. His book Getting To Yes is among the most successful guides to negotiation.

His TED talk is about what he calls the third side in any negotiation. It’s about getting out of your own head and out into the world where both you and your opponent have to live.

In many ways, marketing is like negotiation, and your target customer is like your opponent. In this model, the third side is the community that your customer belongs to. From the beginning, Rebel has advised clients that understanding the demographics and psycho-graphics of consumers is not nearly enough. You have to understand the community — how it functions, what it values, the ways that influence moves throughout.

You won’t get this from research reports. You get it by walking the path. You get it by physically walking through the community, virtually visiting the websites and Facebook groups, reading the magazines, listening to the music. You get it by talking to people.

If you aren’t willing to do that, you’re not ready to negotiate with people to earn their attention, much less their hard-earned dollars.


 

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Presentations

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Even if you don’t make presentations for a living, it pays to know what a good one looks like. Whether you call them decks, power points, or the traditional slide presentations you need to know how to keep your audience from taking a nap.

 


STEAL IT…. I DID

 

 

 

 

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Rebel Industries Casting For Brand Ambassador

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Rebel is looking for a female who knows the gaming world

You will travel to Major League Gaming live events to represent one of our premiere beverage brands. We are looking for someone who has 2+ years marketing/promotions experience with a personality that can connect with gamers and influencers. A self-motivator who works well in a team environment, and has an active athletic lifestyle — fit for days spent connecting the brand to an audience.

This job involves traveling to some cool events. You’ll interact with consumers, sample and talk about the product and play some games. So gaming knowledge is a huge plus.

Interested? Email us at casting@rebelindustries.com with:

  • Resume
  • One head shot
  • One body shot
  • Short blurb on why you should be considered

 

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What’s Wrong With Social Media

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Sometimes the Hard Way Is the Only Way

Check out this social media conference:

In one day you’ll become an expert in:
  • How to get people to “like” your brand
  • Developing a winning content strategy to engage your followers
  • Measuring the impact of your Facebook initiatives
  • Creating your Facebook dream team
  • Mastering Facebook’s latest features and adding a new gear to your PR efforts
  • Integrating Facebook into your overall communications plan

At least they’re not over-promising.

Have you ever become an expert in anything in one day? What about six things? If it were that easy, would you really need to attend a conference about it?

The real promise of social media is that it helps human beings create a more connected, more creative world. The promise for brands is that they get to participate in that world and more importantly thrive in it.

But it isn’t going to be easy.

If you think it’s about a one-day seminar, you are sadly mistaken. If you think it’s about having the receptionist, intern, or PR person load your TV commercials into YouTube, you are in big trouble. If you think you can outsource it and forget it, you had better forget it.

Social media is not a new media channel that companies can buy, like the way they buy billboard space. I know it would be SO MUCH EASIER if it was, but it just isn’t. It’s a new way of having relationships with customers, and non-customers, and people who may never be interested in your product at all but might have something to add to a conversation that makes it more interesting for everyone else.

What the marketing world needs right now is not seminars and white papers that purport to make everyone experts. What if they said:

You know what, this is hard stuff. You’re not going to get it right over night. We can help you ease the pain and make sure you get it right over time and avoid the potential disasters along the way.

I guess if they did that, they’d sound a bit like us and ticket sales would surely be affected.

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Are You a Fox or a Hedgehog?

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I picked up The Signal and the Noise by Nate Silver. If you don’t know him by name you definitely saw him during the election. He’s a baseball statistics guru turned political forecaster who essentially predicted the last two elections. Silver introduces the idea of a being a hedgehog vs being a fox; which he borrowed from the essay The Hedgehog and the Fox by philosopher Isaiah Berlin.

Hedgehogs are type-A, headstrong, leader types who walk around like they have “the answer,” often with little regard for whether that answer happens to be correct. They view the world through the lens of a single idea.  Think political pundits (whose predictions, Silver points out, are generally right about 50% of the time, which means they know essentially nothing) or TV weathermen, who know even less.

They’re also the CMOs who wasted billions on banner ads that nobody ever sees, and continue throwing other billions into TV commercials that the audience is skipping or ads in newspapers that no one ever reads.

In our business, it means picking the biggest artist of the year for a tour sponsorship, even though the kids have already moved on. Or paying a celebrity to Tweet for you, even though she has massive reach and zero influence.

Clients these days want to know if Facebook is THE ANSWER, or maybe it’s Pinterest.

My answer: Stop asking the wrong question.

Why? Because I’m like Nate, a fox. The fox doubts the power of the big idea. Guys like us aren’t so concerned with being right. We want to find out the truth. And the truth is generally much more nuanced. There are often dozens, hundreds, or even millions of small answers that need to be aggregated, analyzed, and tested over time.

Foxes realize there are multiple approaches to a problem. This way is much harder and often less satisfying. Just about the only thing it has going for is accuracy.

Sounds simple right? But you may be more hedgehog than you think. So ask yourself the question: Are you a hedgehog or a fox?

 

“The fox knows many things, but the hedgehog only one big thing”

Isaiah Berlin


 

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The Enlightened Cocktail

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We love how sipping on an OM cocktail leaves us feeling good before, during, and after happy hour!  OM is the first USDA certified organic prepared cocktail,  but co-creators Jason Monkarsh and renowned mixologist-author Natalie Bovis focus on more than what goes into your body. The bottle is made from eco-friendly materials and for every bottle sold a tree is planted.

Follow OM on Facebook and Twitter for some great drink recipes and tips on how to live a more centered life. So enjoy a Wild Cranberry & Blood Orange Cocktail while reading about ways to organize your space!

 

 

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What I’ve Learned

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It’s a new year and although resolutions rarely hold up, some inspirational words of advice can be a good way to begin 2013. Taken from Esquire Magazine’s What I’ve Learned Column, here are some of our favorites. Interested in more? Click on the names to read in its entirety.

 

John Oates

“Aspire to hard work, talent, and passion. Fame is not something to aspire to.”

Joe Biden

“I know it sounds corny, but my definition of power is the ability to help people.
Nobody owes you a living. But everyone’s entitled to dignity.”

Chris Bosh “You learn to respect team chemistry… It’s not, We’ve played some games, we have chemistry now. You have to talk on and off the court, see mistakes, correct mistakes, learn tendencies. It’s constant work, and it comes with time.
I’d get on Twitter and see all the nasty things being written. It’s funny what words will do. Even when you know they’re bogus, you still see them. The negative impact is still the same.”

Gary Oldman

“What other people think of me is none of my business.”Fuck ‘em.” Shortest prayer in the world.
A lazy man works twice as hard. My mother told that to me, and now I say it to my kids. If you’re writing an essay, keep it in the lines and in the margins so you don’t have to do it over.”

Art Garfunkel

“Whatever your kids are comes from you. So whatever irritates, look at yourself.
It seems to me that at nineteen or twenty, a young man is burning to be great at something. I was. You have a vision that’s beyond the neighborhood. You want to make a mark while you’re alive. You don’t know exactly your future, but you want to be great at it.”

Bernie Taupin

“Don’t call my lyrics poetry. It’s an insult to real poets.
There are songs that, to this day, Elton thinks I’ve written about him when they’re actually about me.”

Jon Cryer

“Critics can say horrible things. It only hurts when I agree with them.
A wonderful actor once told me, “Jon, I don’t respect anybody who hasn’t been fired at least once.”

Jeffrey Tambor

“The moment you think you’re somebody, you’re nobody.
The secret of life is to be surrounded by people who get you — just the people who get you.”

Scottie Pippen

“What I’ve learned from being successful is to be thankful.
Chemistry is something that a team has to develop over time. It comes from being out on the court together. It comes from playing cards together. It comes from watching other teams play together. It comes from being in the film room together. It comes from winning.”

Charlie Murphy
“I was sitting in this mogul’s house. My brother was there, and they were having lunch… Diana Ross is sitting with Eddie in the mogul’s section. I’m with some common folk on the other side. We’re talking, having fun. One guy happens to use the f word. And Diana Ross comes all the way across the room and says, “Excuse me, I don’t know who you gentlemen are, but I don’t tolerate any profanity in my vicinity.” Now, we’re not at Diana Ross’s house. We’re in another house. We don’t work for her. That’s what we’re all thinking. And one guy goes, “Fuck you, Diana.” She was stunned. Her face, it looked like pieces of it were falling off. No one was sorry. Because what sticks out in this story for me is: Why are people kissing Diana Ross’s ass? Is she God? No. She sang on some records and did a good job! I give her her props. But that doesn’t make you more of an adult than me. That doesn’t give you any more rights than me. Being your fan is optional. If you forget that, because everybody’s been blowing sunshine up your ass, you’re putting yourself in the position to take a fall. That’s the moral of the story. Always stay humble. It’s the only way you can’t get humiliated.
I believe everyone has a gift, an ability. Something that you actually realize and start to hone. There are people who are acknowledged as the top electrician. The top dentist. The number-one brain surgeon. There are people who’ve become millionaires from plumbing.
The thing is, most people grow up having their brains trained to be a worker. That’s how the school system trains you. Be a worker. The school system doesn’t train you to be the one who’s running things.”

 

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12 Ways To Avoid The End

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No, we at Rebel don’t believe the world is coming to an end, but it did get us talking about our client relationships. Nothing worse than being told it’s over and 12 out of 12 times (see what we did there?) it’s usually something that could have been avoided.  Full disclosure, we’ve been guilty of a few of these…..

Make a racist (or otherwise insensitive) Twitter post on your client’s behalf.

Don’t return a call for more than 24 hours.

  • There is no 9-5. Clients expect responses in the immediate. Can’t call back? Then send an email, text, tweet, an intern singing telegram.

Ignore your client’s objectives. Focus instead on what you do best, whether it helps their business or not.

  • The customer is always right. They may not know the best way to execute it, but that’s your job.

Sell your client something he doesn’t really want. After all, you’re a great salesperson.

Tell your client her stupid idea is, well, stupid.

  • Trust me there have been times we have wanted to do this. Many times. Instead we found a way to change the way a client thinks with0ut saying “Honestly I have no idea how you made it this far in life”

Demand to get paid upfront, even though your client pays net-30.

  • Tacky. Also, If you need to get paid upfront you need someone else managing your company’s books.We heard long ago that big companies work with big agencies in part because they don’t get hassled about money. That’s what clients want — no hassles.

Know less about your client’s target consumer than she does.

  • Do your homework.

Be late on deliverables.

  • If you are 5 minutes early, you’re on time. If you’re on time, you’re late. If you’re late, then you’ve got a lot of explaining to do, and in the words of a former client, “Don’t apologize. Don’t explain why. Just do it right.”

Be great in the boardroom when you’re presenting, but useless out in the field where it really counts.

  • You never want to be known as all flash and no substance. That kind of rep travels fast and this world is pretty small. We don’t want to name names but we could.

Get caught trying to sound like an expert (or maybe a “digital native”) in areas where you don’t really know what you’re talking about.

  • Most likely there will be a question you can’t answer or worse you will come across someone who is an expert and then it’s just all kinds of awkward.

Get drunk at an event you’re producing for a client.

  • A lot of our events involve alcohol. A lot of our clients are booze or booze related. Regardless we have a no drinking policy. It wasn’t always like this, but there was an incident. It became a she said she said type of thing. Eventually there will always be an incident.

Take poor care of your staff and/or vendors, and hope it never gets back to your client.

  • Your entire reputation can be ruined by one small bad review. The way you treat your staff and vendors is a huge reflection on how you run your business. Clients have known to end a relationship when they see internal conflict. Don’t pay your vendors on time? It’s a small fraternity and it will eventually cost you business.
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